"Professor Quest: Video Games and Creativity" is an interactive visual novel where you can learn about the relationship between video game play and creativity. Created for the EPSY8280E course at the University of Georgia.


Game controls:

ENTER - Proceed and speed up text.

MOUSE CLICK - Select option on the screen.

SPACE - Hides text box.

Screen buttons:

LOG - Shows previous conversations.

CONFIG - Allows you to change settings of the game, such as text speed and sound volume. 

MENU - Opens the menu, where the user can save the game. 

Bibliographical References:

Dane, E. (2010). Reconsidering the trade-off between expertise and flexibility: A cognitive entrenchment perspective. Academy of Management Review, 35(4), 579-603.

Gee, J. P. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: MacMillan.

Gee, J. P. (2005). Learning by design: good video games as learning machines. E-learning and Digital Media, 2(1), 5-16.

Gee, J. P. (2008). Video games and embodiment. Games and Culture3(3-4), 253-263.

Gee, J. P. (2011). Stories, probes, and games. Narrative inquiry21(2), 353-357.

Granic, I., Lobel, A., & Engels, R. C. (2014). The benefits of playing video games. American Psychologist69(1), 66.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robison, A. J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Mit Press.

Kafai, Y. B. & Burke, Q. (2016). Connected Gaming: What making video games can teach us about learning and literacy. MIT Press.

Prensky, M. (2003). Digital game-based learning. Computers in Entertainment (CIE)1(1), 21-21.

Reinders, H. (2009). Using computer games to teach writing. English Teaching Professional63, 6-58.

Ritter, S. M., Damian, R. I., Simonton, D. K., van Baaren, R. B., Strick, M., Derks, J., & Dijksterhuis, A. (2012). Diversifying experiences enhance cognitive flexibility. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology48(4), 961-964.

Runco, M. A. (Ed.). (1994). Problem finding, problem solving, and creativity. Greenwood Publishing Group.

Runco, M.A., & Kim, D. (2011). The four Ps of creativity:Person, Process, Product and Press. In M.A. Runco & S.R. Pritzker (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Creativity (2nd ed.), New York: Academic Press.

Squire, K. (2005). Changing the game: what happens when video games enter the classroom?. Innovate: Journal of online education, 1(6).Dane, E. (2010). Reconsidering the trade-off between expertise and flexibility: A cognitive entrenchment perspective. Academy of Management Review, 35(4), 579-603.

Gee, J. P. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: MacMillan.

Gee, J. P. (2005). Learning by design: good video games as learning machines. E-learning and Digital Media, 2(1), 5-16.

Gee, J. P. (2008). Video games and embodiment. Games and Culture3(3-4), 253-263.

Gee, J. P. (2011). Stories, probes, and games. Narrative inquiry21(2), 353-357.

Granic, I., Lobel, A., & Engels, R. C. (2014). The benefits of playing video games. American Psychologist69(1), 66.

Jenkins, H., Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., & Robison, A. J. (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Mit Press.

Kafai, Y. B. & Burke, Q. (2016). Connected Gaming: What making video games can teach us about learning and literacy. MIT Press.

Prensky, M. (2003). Digital game-based learning. Computers in Entertainment (CIE)1(1), 21-21.

Reinders, H. (2009). Using computer games to teach writing. English Teaching Professional63, 6-58.

Ritter, S. M., Damian, R. I., Simonton, D. K., van Baaren, R. B., Strick, M., Derks, J., & Dijksterhuis, A. (2012). Diversifying experiences enhance cognitive flexibility. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology48(4), 961-964.

Runco, M. A. (Ed.). (1994). Problem finding, problem solving, and creativity. Greenwood Publishing Group.

Runco, M.A., & Kim, D. (2011). The four Ps of creativity:Person, Process, Product and Press. In M.A. Runco & S.R. Pritzker (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Creativity (2nd ed.), New York: Academic Press.

Squire, K. (2005). Changing the game: what happens when video games enter the classroom?. Innovate: Journal of online education, 1(6).



More information

Published 7 days ago
StatusIn development
PlatformsHTML5
Authorrleon

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